askfreddyfezbear

alphathegriffin17 asked:

One for all the gang: For times when there isn't a security gu- I mean, endoskeleton to put back into a suit, what do you guys like to do when free roam kicks in at night? You have the run of the place, after all.

askfreddyfezbear answered:

Freddy: I’m usually stuck trying to keep Chica from eating all the pizzas.

Chica: I give Freddy the slip and eat the pizzas.~

Bonnie: I sometimes spend time with Foxy and other times just roam about on my own.

Foxy: I kick out Bonnie when she’s botherin me.

[Thanks for answering my questions. This is an RP blog too, right? Mind if I start something like reporting in as the new security guard?]

askfreddyfezbear

alphathegriffin17 asked:

Hey Bonnie. This might seem like an odd question, but are you male or female? A lot of people seem to be confused. Also, for Chica, what's your favourite pizza topping?

askfreddyfezbear answered:

Bonnie: “Well…to be correct about it I suppose you could say I’m both. I was a man at one point back in the day but my voice box, personality, and everything else was changed to look and sound more feminine.”

Chica: “I LOVE MEAT!!! THERE HAS TO BE TONS OF IT! PEPPERONI, SAUSAGE, HAMBURGER, BACON, CANADIAN BACON, ALL THE BACON!~ Oh… I made myself hungry… SEE YA GUYS!~”

thebestfriendszaibatsu

Prison Break breaks Pat

  • Matt: Press A! Go!
  • Pat: ....
  • Matt: Its done...the loading.
  • Pat: ....
  • Matt: Press it!!
  • Pat: ........
  • Matt: Nooo!
  • Pat: (barely audible giggling)
  • Matt: Why are you just laughing?!....Why are you just going over to stop the recording?!
  • Pat: (giggling intensifies)
  • Video Ends
  • Matt was later found dead in his apartment.
redweddingsandbowties

In a sudden shocking moment, I saw Clara Oswald, (The Impossible Girl/puzzle to be solved/proud leaf owner), evolve into a RTD style fully fledged, three dimensional, actual human being with her own agency, and her own very important part to play in the tale.

The best part of the episode, in my opinion, was seeing Clara face off (geddit?) against the lead droid/robot/cyborg. Jenna must have had about ten whole minutes to herself. She certainly was gifted a massive chunk of the episode to carry, and not only did she lift the show, she brandished it heavyweight style above her 5’1 Victorian-attire-clad body.

Suddenly Clara becomes clear. We know her. She’s brave, but very scared. Her bravery seems to kick in with the adrenaline, and until then she staves off the rising terror with sarcasm and snappy banter. If you want Clara Oswald at peak condition, at her very very best, you threaten to hurt a friend. Because she never runs out on the people she loves. Even if they seem to have run out on her.

The flashbacks to Clara’s first day teaching at a school made all the difference to my interpretation of her. Seeing Ms Oswald have her usually in-control and optimistic persona challenged as we see her becoming ruffled and losing patience, makes her so much more human. Although she is often labelled ‘bossy’, I see a young woman desperate to be taken seriously, and to break away from her reputation as ‘sweet little Clara’. She means business, she has ambition, and I respect that in a woman.

Think of all the little girls watching Clara this episode. Maybe they want to be braver. Maybe people laugh at them because they’re girls whenever they try to take control. (I think a lot of us have been there). Maybe there are young women watching that are fighting to maintain their kindness and compassion but also navigate the professional world.

From Claudia Boleyn’s Deep Breath Review (x). Wonderfully written, as usual, and sums up most of my opinions of the episode. Check it out! (via oswinsleaf)
alexphoenixwing
brainedbysaucepans:

nightguardmod:

brainedbysaucepans:

mlpartconfessions:

There is not a single term in this (or any) fandom that is LESS useful than the term “Mary Sue”. Mary Sue originally meant an overpowered OC, but has come to mean any “bad” OC. The sticky point is, when a person bandies about the term Mary Sue, who benefits? The artist only gets hurt feelings and has no way of knowing what about their creation is so offensive, and the accuser proves themselves to be little more than a weak excuse for a troll. Absolutely no one is happier. You are better off saying nothing at all.
If you find an OC to be so offensive to you that you are tempted to call it a Mary Sue, stop and ask yourself “What is so bad about this OC?” If your answer starts with “Well I don’t like…” or “I think that…” or “It has a really bad art style…” then kindly click on Dashboard button or home button and never go back; anything you say after that point is not constructive criticism. Your own headcanons about alicorns or rainbow manes or chagelings are irrelevant to the owner of the OC, as they clearly don’t share them if their OC is an Alicorn, has rainbow hair, or is a changeling. If you have a legitimate complaint, ie “Every time you try to interact with another pony you try to seduce them, which makes people uncomfortable”, “The contrast of colors on this pony is too sharp and jarring and might do better if the black was lighter”, then stop and see if the owner has asked for criticism. If the answer is “no”, click on the Dashboard button and don’t look back. If the answer is yes, then politely and succinctly tell them what about their pony bothers you and how you recommend fixing it. (If you have no way to fix the problem, again, Dashboard).
I’ll close by saying I am not addressing this to trolls. Trolls are not courteous by nature, and only care about carnage, not criticism. Quite honestly, they are only intelligent enough to sling mud until someone snaps, shouting “Kill yourself” and “Your art is ****” because they have nothing real or useful to say. I am addressing this to responsible, intelligent fans of the show. “Mary Sue” is an archaic and meaningless term with no real use in an articulate and thoughtful critic’s vocabulary. Just consider that, when you next try to help another artist.
- Anonymous

This. So much this.

Adamant is the self-insert, Westwood is the Mary Sue.
I actually use Mary Sue as a writers term, but only in regards to my own characters or in discussing with friends. The OP highlights why, in that none of the examples given are actually Mary Sues, but just wielding the word about to hurt.
A Mary Sue is a character whose traits or actions cause characters and/or the world itself to behave in a manner that appears out of character. This can be either due to conflicting with what’s already been established or conflicting to what may be assumed due to not having established that which would allow an exception from the norm. With this definition, we can use Mary Sue constructively.
Manzanita capturing Wild Card is Mary Sue-ish, unless I talk with Wild Mod and discover a logical way of how that happened. (In this case, it was that she appeared as a lost elderly lady, not a night guard, allowing her to get close enough, and WC distracted enough to let her ambush successfully)
Ada blocking Chryssy’s attack is also a Mary Sue thing to do, but the show had already established wing spells and that dragons are nigh invulnerable. So introducing night guard wings as dragon wings allows me to not break the world in a Mary Sue fashion.
And Westwood… well, spoilers.

And this just highlights why the term is so useless; the way you use it makes it a valid criticism, but it’s become opaque by acquiring so many different definitions. If you have to clarify precisely what you mean each time you use a term, the term is meaningless.
When someone brings up the term they could mean any number of things; are they calling the character a self-insert? Are they saying they’re overpowered? Is the character’s presence making others act OOC? Is the quality of the prose itself poor? I’ve seen the term used in all these contexts, and in every case the discussion would have been a lot clearer and less divisive if they’d said what they meant rather than just going with the generic, catch all term that “Mary Sue” has become.

brainedbysaucepans:

nightguardmod:

brainedbysaucepans:

mlpartconfessions:

There is not a single term in this (or any) fandom that is LESS useful than the term “Mary Sue”. Mary Sue originally meant an overpowered OC, but has come to mean any “bad” OC. The sticky point is, when a person bandies about the term Mary Sue, who benefits? The artist only gets hurt feelings and has no way of knowing what about their creation is so offensive, and the accuser proves themselves to be little more than a weak excuse for a troll. Absolutely no one is happier. You are better off saying nothing at all.

If you find an OC to be so offensive to you that you are tempted to call it a Mary Sue, stop and ask yourself “What is so bad about this OC?” If your answer starts with “Well I don’t like…” or “I think that…” or “It has a really bad art style…” then kindly click on Dashboard button or home button and never go back; anything you say after that point is not constructive criticism. Your own headcanons about alicorns or rainbow manes or chagelings are irrelevant to the owner of the OC, as they clearly don’t share them if their OC is an Alicorn, has rainbow hair, or is a changeling. If you have a legitimate complaint, ie “Every time you try to interact with another pony you try to seduce them, which makes people uncomfortable”, “The contrast of colors on this pony is too sharp and jarring and might do better if the black was lighter”, then stop and see if the owner has asked for criticism. If the answer is “no”, click on the Dashboard button and don’t look back. If the answer is yes, then politely and succinctly tell them what about their pony bothers you and how you recommend fixing it. (If you have no way to fix the problem, again, Dashboard).

I’ll close by saying I am not addressing this to trolls. Trolls are not courteous by nature, and only care about carnage, not criticism. Quite honestly, they are only intelligent enough to sling mud until someone snaps, shouting “Kill yourself” and “Your art is ****” because they have nothing real or useful to say. I am addressing this to responsible, intelligent fans of the show. “Mary Sue” is an archaic and meaningless term with no real use in an articulate and thoughtful critic’s vocabulary. Just consider that, when you next try to help another artist.

- Anonymous

This. So much this.

Adamant is the self-insert, Westwood is the Mary Sue.

I actually use Mary Sue as a writers term, but only in regards to my own characters or in discussing with friends. The OP highlights why, in that none of the examples given are actually Mary Sues, but just wielding the word about to hurt.

A Mary Sue is a character whose traits or actions cause characters and/or the world itself to behave in a manner that appears out of character. This can be either due to conflicting with what’s already been established or conflicting to what may be assumed due to not having established that which would allow an exception from the norm. With this definition, we can use Mary Sue constructively.

Manzanita capturing Wild Card is Mary Sue-ish, unless I talk with Wild Mod and discover a logical way of how that happened. (In this case, it was that she appeared as a lost elderly lady, not a night guard, allowing her to get close enough, and WC distracted enough to let her ambush successfully)

Ada blocking Chryssy’s attack is also a Mary Sue thing to do, but the show had already established wing spells and that dragons are nigh invulnerable. So introducing night guard wings as dragon wings allows me to not break the world in a Mary Sue fashion.

And Westwood… well, spoilers.

And this just highlights why the term is so useless; the way you use it makes it a valid criticism, but it’s become opaque by acquiring so many different definitions. If you have to clarify precisely what you mean each time you use a term, the term is meaningless.

When someone brings up the term they could mean any number of things; are they calling the character a self-insert? Are they saying they’re overpowered? Is the character’s presence making others act OOC? Is the quality of the prose itself poor? I’ve seen the term used in all these contexts, and in every case the discussion would have been a lot clearer and less divisive if they’d said what they meant rather than just going with the generic, catch all term that “Mary Sue” has become.